Grow Up Smiling!

Does Your Child Have "Dentist Visit Anxiety"?

Date: November 10, 2017 | Time: 11:06am | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Does Your Child Have "Dentist Visit Anxiety"?

When it is time to visit the dentist, many children are fearful and anxious. Some of these fears are derived from previous experiences, such as having received a shot or having had a tooth drilled or extracted. Others are often based on anxieties about the unknown and what might happen. Even when previous visits haven't resulted in discomfort, many children find the sounds and sights, such as loud drills and suction machines, sharp metal tools and bright lights, scary.

As a parent watching your child struggle with these worries, you may feel helpless, but you can take several steps to encourage your child to feel more comfortable about the checkup. Here are a few things you can do to help your child cope:
  • Try not to take your child with you to your own dental visits. You could wind up transferring your own fears-even subconscious ones-to your child.
  • Discuss the visit and your child's fears before coming to our office. But don't give your child too many details or make any promises about what will or will not happen.
  • Do not talk about shots, drills, extractions or other potentially frightening aspects of dental care.
  • Practice what you preach: Go to the dentist regularly, without talking about fears or worries or demonstrating anxiety.
  • Understand that fear is not an uncommon emotion in children. Many children may feel separation anxiety, and fear of the unknown is especially common.
  • Emphasize the role of going to the dentist in keeping teeth healthy and smiles bright.
  • Do not cave in and cancel or postpone appointments; your child should understand that going to the dentist is a necessity, not a choice.
Let Dr. Jared and his clinical team know about your child's worries. As a pediatric dental practice, we are trained in treating scared children. We know how to help worried children calm down once they sit in our chair. And that can help your child feel more in control.

Give us a call at (509)-891-7070 to schedule today!
<view entire article>





Great Candy Buy Back 2017 Top Ten

Date: October 31, 2017 | Time: 10:27am | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)


The Top Ten Reasons to join us on
November 1st between 4 and 8 PM . . .


10. $1 per pound for children's leftover Halloween candy
Event underwritten by Banner Bank. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Candy must be factory wrapped. No pixy stix, please.

9. Opportunities to win tickets to our upcoming movie event
You could be one of the first in Spokane to see "Star Wars: The Last Jedi" with the KiDDS Dental Team!

8. Dr. Scott Ralph's team in SUPER SECRET costumes

7. The KiDDS Dental team in SUPER SECRET costumes

6. Telling soldiers "Thank You!" with a handmade card


4. Goody bags
Participants will receive coupons and promotional products from participating and local businesses.
Follow us on Facebook for specific details about the fun stuff we'll have in the goody bags.

3. Photo booth
This year we'll have a self-serve photo booth with props to entertain the kids and commemorate the event.
2. Support the troops!All candy will be shipped to members of the armed services stationed overseas through Operation Gratitude.
1. No more cavity-causing, hyperactivity-inducing candy in the house!
<view entire article>





KiDDS Dental takes you to the movies . . .

Date: October 30, 2017 | Time: 3:00pm | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

KiDDS Dental Introduces
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
December 14, 2017
Regal Cinemas
Spokane Valley Mall



To qualify for tickets you may:
  • Share with us your children's Halloween costumes! Email your picture to Halloween@GrowUpSmiling.com by November 2nd at noon. We'll be posting the picture to our Facebook page. The picture with the most votes earns two tickets to the movie.
  • Guess how much weight we'll bring in at our 10th Annual Great Candy Buy Back. Click here to be taken directly to the post where you can leave your guess!
  • Bring us a hand-written letter of appreciation for our troops by November 6th at noon. We will mail the letters to Operation Gratitude, where they will be placed in holiday care packages for troops and first responders. Write as many heartfelt letters as you want (no photo copies). Each hand-written letter will earn you one entry for the drawing.
  • Bring your children to our 10th Annual Great Candy Buy Back underwritten by Banner Bank where you can enter to win tickets.
  • All non-winning entries for all contests will be included in our last chance drawings. Enter as many contests as you can! We have over 100 tickets to give away.
  • Follow the directions on contest posts on the KiDDS Dental Facebook page between now and the night of the movie.
Winners will be notified by phone, e-mail or FB messenger on or before December 4th. Tickets will be available to pick up on December 7th between 9 am and 4 pm and December 11th and December 12th between 8 am and 5 pm. Tickets not picked up by 5 pm on Tuesday, December 12th will be considered forfeited by the winner and distributed to others. <view entire article>





Does Parents' Stress Lead to Child's Cavities?

Date: October 27, 2017 | Time: 9:52am | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Does Parents' Stress Lead to Child's Cavities?

Stress-the kind that weighs heavily upon adults' minds, no matter what its cause-is clearly not a good thing in any context. It may be a negative factor in their children's dental health. Scientists have tried to study the nature of the relationship between parental stress and caries (dental cavities) in their children.

One factor is financial. Parents or guardians who are barely getting by are much more likely to experience stress. Usually, such parents are also pressed for time, perhaps by working more than one job or having an extra-long commute because of slow public transportation. Less time can mean less opportunity for taking children to the dentist. And less money can mean that parents, despite possible good intentions, may feel they can't afford dental care, especially routine visits. Although low-cost options, such as dental school clinics, may well be available, researching those possibilities takes time, which, again, overly stressed parents are less likely to have.

A generational link may also exist. Parents who are stressed may themselves come from families where dental checkups were not a top priority, and so it becomes less of a priority for their children, too. Fewer checkups and fewer reminders about the importance of daily dental health routines can mean more cavities. More cavities, and more fillings, can exacerbate fear of future dental visits.

Sometimes, the cycle begins even before a child is born. Mothers who experience poor dental health while they are pregnant may give birth to children who are more likely to have caries. The prevalence, and subsequent transfer, of the cavity-causing bacteria in the mother may be at the root of that problem.


So, while ascertaining the exact nature of cause-and-effect when it comes to parental stress and children' cavities might be significant, one practical take-away message is clear:Parents should be aware of their own stress levels and make every effort to keep their offspring stress-free. It will make life calmer while keeping your child's teeth and gums healthier.

Click here to schedule an appointment with Dr. Jared. Or give us a call at (509)-891-7070.
<view entire article>





Does My Child Need a Tooth Pulled?

Date: October 13, 2017 | Time: 9:47am | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Does My Child Need a Tooth Pulled?

Dental extraction is one of the most feared reasons to visit a dentist's office. To many parents, extraction represents a worst-case scenario. Many causes of tooth extraction are preventable, although others are not. While unfortunate, it's important to remember that, when your child's dentist pulls a tooth, it is to benefit the overall dental health of your child.

The preventable causes of tooth extraction are related to general safety and good oral care. Sports accidents are one of the leading causes of broken and dislodged teeth. If your child is engaged in sports, particularly contact sports, it is important that he or she wears a mouthguard. Another leading cause of tooth extraction is severe decay. The best way to prevent this outcome is to make sure that your child regularly brushes, flosses and visits Dr. Jared.

However, some reasons for tooth extraction are not preventable. Sometimes, if a child's baby teeth don't fall out at the proper time, they can prevent adult teeth from coming in correctly. That may require removing the baby tooth. If your child needs braces, it is occasionally necessary to remove a tooth to ensure that the rest of the teeth align properly. A large number of children and adults will need to have impacted wisdom teeth removed. Finally, certain prescription drugs or medical procedures can result in changes to your child's gums or teeth. If a child is undergoing radiation therapy, irradiated teeth may need to be removed.


Fortunately, children can be much more resilient than their parents, and losing a tooth is usually less painful and less uncomfortable for them. If your child has been especially good, you might want to consider inviting the tooth fairy over for a visit. It will certainly help blunt the sting of losing a tooth.

Call us to schedule an appointment today! (509)-891-7070. We'd love to meet you and your family.
<view entire article>





Does Breastfeeding Prevent Early Childhood Cavities?

Date: September 29, 2017 | Time: 9:45am | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Does Breastfeeding Prevent Early Childhood Cavities?
Parents often wonder whether the choice of breastfeeding will help reduce a baby's risk of developing dental cavities in future years. Can primarily nursing an infant instead of bottle-feeding truly make a dental difference? The answer turns out to be-maybe. What's actually most important is to keep your child's mouth as free of sugar as possible at all times. Just about any residual food or liquid particles, other than pure water, that are left in the mouth contain sugar or compounds that become sugar. Surprisingly, that includes breast milk as well as formula.
Cavities are actually a bacterial infection, usually caused by Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). Because this bacterium is so common, your infant almost surely has it once he or she has one or more teeth. S. mutans can feed on any small particle of sugar left on that tooth. After consuming the sugar, the bacteria produce acid, and this residual acid causes decay.
Keeping your baby's mouth sugar-free means cleaning his or her gums with a soft cloth after every feeding, even if no teeth have yet emerged. As an added benefit, your infant will get used to good oral hygiene, so transitioning later to toothbrushing will be easier.
Also key is not letting your infant drift off to sleep during feedings. Sugar residue remains in the mouth whether your child is drinking breast milk, formula or any other nonwater beverage. What's more, babies (like all human beings) produce less saliva while sleeping, so those sugar particles are less likely to be "rinsed" away.
Breast milk does contain natural chemicals that are beneficial in many ways; one even offers some resistance to S. mutans. And compared with formula or juice, breast milk contributes relatively little to acid production in your child's mouth. Still, lengthy nighttime nursing is risky for future development of cavities.

At your next visit to KiDDS Dental, we'll tell you more about how to properly care for your infant's teeth to help him or her get a good start in avoiding cavities, whether fed primarily by breast or bottle.
Give us a call at (509)-891-7070 to schedule today!
<view entire article>





Diabetes and Bad Breath

Date: September 15, 2017 | Time: 9:42am | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Diabetes and Bad Breath

A child with type 1 diabetes presents special challenges to a parent. Maintaining your child's proper blood sugar levels through diet is likely your primary concern. But maintaining your child's oral health should also be high on the list, not only because diabetes can lead to cavities and periodontal disease but also because it can cause bad breath.

When there is too little insulin in the blood or when insulin resistance is too high, the body utilizes fats instead of glucose to provide energy. That process produces ketones, an acidic waste product that can be excreted on the breath.

High sugar levels in the blood can also lead to high sugar levels in saliva. Because bacteria thrive in high-sugar environments, people with diabetes are much more prone to cavities and periodontal disease, which also can cause bad breath.

If your child has diabetes, it is important that you be extra vigilant about his or her blood sugar regulation and dental care so that the diabetes does not lead to bad breath and other dental conditions. To maintain a healthy mouth, we recommend the following tips for your child:
  • Brush the teeth at least twice a day, and floss once a day.
  • Brush the tongue as well, because it is a breeding place for bacteria.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Eat a healthy diet with few sugary foods and drinks.
  • Visit us regularly.

If your child has type 1 diabetes, be sure to let our office know so that we can provide him or her with optimal dental care. Between visits at KiDDS Dental, it is also important that you and your child remain focused on dental hygiene. Together, we can prevent many of the oral conditions associated with diabetes so that your child maintains a healthy mouth as he or she grows into adulthood.

If you have further questions about diabetes and bad breath, click here to schedule an appointment with Dr. Jared. Or give us a call at (509)-891-7070.
<view entire article>





Devour Some Good Children's Books About Oral Health

Date: September 1, 2017 | Time: 9:38am | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Devour Some Good Children's Books About Oral Health

Reading to children is important for a myriad of reasons, but there's one you may not have thought about: promoting dental health. Dental caries (tooth decay) is actually the most common infectious disease affecting children in the United States. Cavities in baby teeth can affect dental health for a lifetime, and getting fillings can have painful-and financial-consequences. The best way to help your children avoid dental problems is to make sure they practice good oral hygiene from a very early age.
Picture books are a great way to bring oral health concepts to life. They can help explain the whys and hows of teeth to young children. Some books focus on proper brushing technique, such as Brushing Well by Helen Frost; Brush Your Teeth, Please by Leslie McGuire; and Ready, Set, Brush! featuring the characters from Sesame Street. Author Sally Huss' Who Needs Teeth? focuses more on the importance of teeth, while other books like Sugarbug Doug by dentist Ben Magleby describe in child-friendly terms how cavities happen.
New experiences can be scary for children, and going to the dentist for the first time is no exception. Sharing stories with your child about dental visits can help demystify the process and may even get him or her excited about going. A number of your children's favorite characters have books on this topic, such as the Berenstain Bears, Curious George, Dora the Explorer and Mercer Mayer's Little Critter. If your child does get a cavity, you can prepare her or him for what's to come with Lisa M. Herrington's I Have a Cavity.
For older children, losing primary teeth can be a big deal. Help prepare them with titles such as Loose Tooth by Lola M. Schaefer and The Night Before the Tooth Fairy by Natasha Wing. School-age children may also enjoy The Tooth Book by Edward Miller, which takes a more science-oriented (but still fun) approach to teaching dental health.


By sharing these books and others like them with your youngsters, you can give them a solid foundation in dental health-and maybe discover some favorite stories along the way.
We'd love to meet you and your family! Give us a call at (509)-891-7070.
<view entire article>





Dental Needs of Your Child with a Hearing Impairment

Date: August 18, 2017 | Time: 9:35am | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Dental Needs of Your Child with a Hearing Impairment
Of every 1,000 children born in the United States, between two and three have a detectable level of hearing loss in one or both ears. If your child has a hearing impairment, you know that medical and dental appointments can be a challenge. As dental professionals trained to deal with many special health care needs, we are committed to providing the best dental care possible, tailored to your child's unique needs and abilities.
When you bring your child in for an appointment at KiDDS Dental, we will first assess speech, language ability and the degree of hearing impairment, so that we can best communicate with your child. We will also eliminate background noise to help us communicate with your child to the best of his or her abilities. If your child reads lips, we will remove our masks when speaking.
When preparing to perform a dental procedure, we will employ the tell-show-do approach, explaining and showing your child what we are going to do so there are no surprises. Dr. Jared and his clinical team want your child to understand what dental equipment we will use and how we will use it before treatment begins-that helps make your child feel more comfortable and relaxed during the procedure.
Children with hearing impairments may also have special dental needs, which we can assess and treat. They are more likely to breathe through their mouths-that can lead to increased risks of dry mouth, dental cavities and gum disease. Studies have shown that dental hygiene education tailored to children with hearing impairments improves their dental hygiene and health. That makes it especially important for these children to receive frequent preventive care and adhere to a regular regimen of dental hygiene.
When you schedule an appointment at KiDDS Dental, let us know that your child has difficulty hearing. Regardless of your child's special health care needs and challenges, we are equipped and committed to ensuring that he or she has the healthiest smile possible.

Give us a call at 509-891-7070 to schedule.
<view entire article>





Dental Injuries and ADHD

Date: August 4, 2017 | Time: 9:26am | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Dental Injuries and ADHD

The causes of dental trauma-injuries to the teeth and mouth area-traditionally have been classified by a child's oral developmental stage. Injuries to a child's baby teeth tend to occur from falls and accidents related to the fact that the child is still learning to walk and run, and hasn't yet fully developed his senses of balance and space. During the time period when baby teeth are being replaced with permanent teeth (transitional dentition), accidents are more likely to result from outdoor activities such as running and bicycling. But falls are still a major factor during this period, with some studies suggesting that falls account for up to 40% of all dental injuries in the transitional dentition.

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that may become apparent before age 7. Children with ADHD often demonstrate poor impulse control, hyperactivity and inattentiveness. Since accidents and falls are the most frequent cause of dental trauma in children, it seems logical that children suffering from ADHD could be more prone to dental trauma than are their peers.

A recent study conducted at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, compared a group of children each of whom a history of recent dental trauma with a group of children without dental trauma. The children's parents completed the ADHD Rating Scale IV, a form that evaluates children for ADHD and its two component parts: (1) inattention and (2) hyperactivity and impulsiveness.

Interestingly, based on the rating scale, both groups of children averaged similar scores for ADHD and for inattention. However, the group of children with dental trauma scored significantly higher for hyperactivity and impulsiveness.

Children with ADHD are more at risk than other children for cavities and are more likely to grind their teeth. And these children's behavioral issues can make visits to KiDDS Dental more difficult for the child and the parent. Parents of children with ADHD should make sure their children use seat belts, bike helmets and mouth guards to help minimize the chances of dental trauma. And they should foster an early and trusting relationship between their child and his dentist.

Click here to schedule an appointment with Dr. Jared today! Or give us a call at (509)-891-7070.


<view entire article>





Dental Hygiene: A Bone of Contention

Date: July 21, 2017 | Time: 9:20am | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Dental Hygiene: A Bone of Contention

When people think about their dentists, they tend to think only about their teeth and gums. Most people don't think about their bones. It's very easy to think of your teeth as little bones that grow out of your gums, but when we talk about bone loss, we aren't just talking about tooth decay. We are talking about your child's jawbone and skull.

Every part of the body is connected. Just as the leg bone is connected to the hipbone, the jawbone and skull are connected to the teeth and gums. Poor dental hygiene can cause harmful acids and bacteria to build up not just on your children's teeth and gums but in the jawbone and skull, causing them to wear away. Your children's teeth live in little holes in those bones. If those holes get eaten away and become too big, your children's teeth can loosen or even fall out.

Another preventable cause of bone loss is osteoporosis, a weakness of the bones caused by a lack of calcium. While this condition is uncommon in children, childhood diet may influence osteoporosis later in life. The best way to prevent osteoporosis and a good piece of health advice in general, is to ensure that your child has a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D. It's never too early to reduce the risk of developing this very serious condition later in life.

Certain conditions such as cancer and autoimmune diseases can cause bone loss; so can certain medical treatments. It's important to let us know at KiDDS Dental when your children have significant changes in their health or if they are taking new medications. Dr. Jared knows the best ways to mitigate the effect of these changes on their teeth.

Bone loss is a serious problem, but one that can be effectively fought.

Give us a call at (509)-891-7070 to schedule today!


<view entire article>





Dental Health Screenings Important for Children

Date: July 7, 2017 | Time: 9:15am | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Dental Health Screenings Important for Children

A dental health screening is a brief examination of your child's teeth, gums, tongue and soft tissue of the mouth performed to identify abnormal conditions so the child can come to the dental office for treatment. Screenings should occur regularly after the first tooth has erupted.

A dental screening by someone other than a dentist-often first performed in the pediatrician's office-is usually the first dental care a child receives. These screenings are usually performed by a dental hygienist, pediatrician, nurse or physician's assistant. People who serve at-risk children are often trained to screen the mouths and teeth of young children. Some states require proof of a dental screening before a child can enroll in school.

Dental health screenings help to identify tooth decay, infected gums and other oral problems. While 89% of America's one-year-old children have had an office-based physician visit, only 1.5% of the same aged children have visited a dental office.

A dental health screening consists of three parts. The screener first inquires about the child's dental health history. This is followed by a brief physical examination of the child's mouth. Finally, the screener will offer a referral to a dentist for preventive care and treatment.

Common problems spotted during a dental health screening include
  • baby bottle tooth decay
  • cavities-28% of children age five and under have one or more cavities
  • missing or damaged teeth
  • sore, swollen or infected gums

In order for these problems not to worsen and compromise your child's health and performance in school, they should be treated by their pediatric dentist. Dr. Jared will screen your child in our office or accept referrals from other screeners.

If you have further questions regarding dental health screenings,click here to schedule an appointment with Dr. Jared. Or give us a call at (509)-891-7070.
<view entire article>





Dental Checklist: Check Your Child's Teeth

Date: June 23, 2017 | Time: 9:09am | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Dental Checklist: Check Your Child's Teeth

A lifetime of good dental health starts at birth. In fact, regular dental care should begin by your child's first birthday, followed by a dental check-up at least twice each consecutive year. This checklist from the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry can help you know the whats, whens and hows of your child's dental health.

Birth to 6 months old

Even though your baby has a gummy smile, you still need to think about his or her teeth. Clean your infant's mouth by wiping the gums with a soft piece of gauze after every feeding and at every bedtime. As your baby starts to get on a more regular schedule, implement better feeding habits (i.e., avoid nursing or bottle-feeding throughout the night, and make sure to wipe your baby's gums after the last feeding of the evening).

6 months old to 2 years old

During this period, your baby will begin teething. Now is a good time to start a dental health routine, brushing after meals and at bedtime with a soft-bristled toothbrush and bringing your child to see us when the first teeth erupt. Because children begin toddling around during the same time these first teeth appear, you also need to be on the lookout for chipped or damaged teeth after your toddler stumbles and falls.

2 years old to 5 and 6 years old

Most children will have their complete first set of teeth by the age of 3 and will begin to lose them to make way for the permanent adult teeth between 5 or 6 years old. Baby (or "deciduous") teeth play an important role in ensuring future dental health: They hold space for future permanent teeth. Infected baby teeth can cause problems long into adulthood. To keep your child's smile healthy, see us every six months or as directed, and instill good dental habits in your child.


Around the age of 12, your child will have his or her full adult smile (aside from wisdom teeth, which come in later). Encourage healthy eating and regular brushing, and see us at KiDDS Dental regularly, so that we-and your child-can keep those teeth pearly white for years to come.

Call us to schedule an appointment today! (509)-891-7070.
<view entire article>





Dental Care for Children with Cerebral Palsy

Date: June 9, 2017 | Time: 1:28pm | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Dental Care for Children with Cerebral Palsy

Parents of children with cerebral palsy already know the unique demands and requirements that must be met just to cope with everyday life. While other life challenges may seem to be of more concern, dental care for children with cerebral palsy is as much a priority as it is for other youngsters.

It is important that parents of a child with cerebral palsy partner with us at KiDDS Dental to create an individualized treatment plan that meets the child's needs with a minimum of undue difficulty, while still protecting his or her teeth and creating a self-care program they can use when they reach adulthood.

The first thing the parent needs to do is communicate the child's needs in advance of their visit. Although our clinical team is trained to deal with the challenges of cerebral palsy, every case is unique. The more we know before your child sits in our dental chair, the better we can tailor our office environment to meet his or her needs, and the better equipped we will be to recommend a specialist if necessary. We have specialized equipment and protocols we can follow, from anesthetics that will make dental procedures less stressful to the use of nonverbal communication methods, such as squeezing a hand in place of speech to indicate discomfort.

Children with cerebral palsy often have elevated risks of certain dental disorders, including
  • bruxism (tooth grinding)
  • malocclusion (displacement of the teeth)
  • difficulty swallowing
  • gum disease
It's important to determine whether your child exhibits any of these conditions. If he or she does, Dr. Jared would love to create a plan to best deal with it at home.


Protecting the dental health of your child with cerebral palsy is a team effort. Make sure to keep us involved.

Give us a call at (509)-891-7070 to schedule an appointment today!
<view entire article>





Father's Day? Nope! Father's Week!

Date: June 8, 2017 | Time: 12:42pm | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Father's DAY? No way!
We'll be celebrating dads ALL WEEK on Facebook
and one lucky winner will get a Kindle Fire HD 8 just for playing along.
Look for a new way to enter to win each day
June 11th through June 17th.


Contest Rules:

By entering this promotion, participant agrees to a complete release of Facebook from any or all liability in connection with this contest. It is also acknowledgment that the contest is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook. No purchase is necessary to enter or win.



How to enter: Entries consist of following the directions (comment, "like," etc.) given in the official promotion posts on the KiDDS Dental Facebook page between June 11, 2017 at 9:00 AM and June 17, 2017 at 5:00 PM. One entry per promotion post per Facebook user is allowed. Multiple entries per promotion post will be disqualified.

Drawing: One random prize drawing will be held on or about June 20, 2017. The winner will receive a Kindle Fire HD 8. This prize is valued at $89. Cash cannot be awarded in lieu of prize. Prize is not transferable. The winner is solely responsible for reporting and paying applicable state and federal taxes. If a winner is disqualified or if a prize is unclaimed, KiDDS Dental reserves the right to conduct another drawing to determine an alternate winner or to not award that winner's prize, at its sole discretion.

Odds: Actual odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries.

Eligibility: Legal residents of the United States are eligible to participate and win. Any person under the age of 18 must have a parent's or legal guardian's permission to participate and/or win. Must be 13 years or older to enter. Employees of KiDDS Dental and their immediate families (spouse, parents, siblings, children, in-laws) are not eligible to enter. Winner must be available to pick up prize in person at KiDDS Dental in Liberty Lake, WA by June 29, 2017.

Decisions: By entering into the promotion, entrants and their parents or guardians (if the entrant is under the age of 18) agree to abide by and be bound by these official rules, and to accept the decision of KiDDS Dental as final. Entrants and their parents or guardians (if entrant is under the age of 18) also agree to hold KiDDS Dental harmless from any liability arising from participation in this promotion. KiDDS Dental is not responsible for entries not received because of technical difficulties. KiDDS Dental reserves the right to disqualify any participant to a person who fails to follow these official rules or uses fraudulent means in participating. If for any reason this promotion is not able to be conducted as planned, KiDDS Dental reserves the right to cancel, terminate, modify or suspend this promotion and randomly draw from the entries received up to the cancellation/suspension date.

Liability Release: By participating, each participant and winner waives any and all claims against KiDDS Dental their employees and agents for any personal loss of any kind which may occur from the participation in the promotion.

Publicity: Each winner (and such winner's parent or guardian if any winner is under the age of 18) agrees to permit KiDDS Dental to use his/her name and likeness in promotional and other KiDDS Dental materials, without additional compensation or permission, except where prohibited by law.

This promotion is void where prohibited.

By entering the contest, entrants grant KiDDS Dental license to display, distribute, reproduce contest entries. Winners must sign a media release and will be responsible for paying any taxes they may owe on a prize.
<view entire article>





Defeating Decay with Sealants

Date: May 26, 2017 | Time: 1:21pm | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Defeating Decay with Sealants

Dental sealants are commonly used in children to reduce cavities in permanent teeth. Bonded to tooth surfaces, these clear or white plastic coatings safely and effectively prevent tooth decay.

Most decay starts in narrow pits and grooves on the biting surfaces of teeth toward the back of the mouth, spaces that are hard to clean with a toothbrush. Within those pits and grooves, bacteria from plaque produce acid, leading to tooth decay.

Sealants work very simply and effectively to fill the grooves. Applying the sealant is a painless, comfortable process that doesn't require injections or drilling, and takes just a few minutes.

Our clinical team at KiDDS Dental will clean and dry your child's teeth; then a thin layer of a plastic liquid is applied into the groove or pit of the tooth. The liquid hardens into a strong layer that protects the tooth and prevents decay. Permanent teeth in the back of the mouth tend to be at a higher risk of tooth decay, making them a priority for sealant application. Some children benefit from sealants on their baby teeth, too.

Sealants are only one part of a healthy program of dental hygiene. We can show you and your child the right way to clean his or her teeth. In addition, use the following tips to help your family:
  • Avoid giving your child sugary foods and drinks.
  • Provide your child with a balanced, nutritious diet.
  • Offer water after meals.
  • Make sure your child has regular dental checkups.
  • Brush your child's teeth twice daily.
  • Use fluoride toothpaste for children ages 2 and older.

At your child's next appointment at KiDDS Dental, Dr. Jared can discuss how sealants can help prevent cavities in his or her teeth. With sealants and good preventive care at home, your child can enjoy a healthy, cavity-free mouth for years to come.

If you have questions about sealants, click here to schedule an appointment with Dr. Jared. Or give us a call at (509)-891-7070.
<view entire article>





Decay-causing Foods That Will Surprise You

Date: May 12, 2017 | Time: 10:00am | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Decay-causing Foods That Will Surprise You
Most of us know that, in the battle against childhood tooth decay, sweetened soft drinks are the mustache-twirling villains. There are sneakier suspects, though, that actually can do just as much damage to your child's dental health. Pickles? Positively. Lemons? Likely. In fact, this group of edibles includes sodas, fruit juices and acidic foods that many children heartily enjoy.
How do these foods damage teeth? Decay occurs when mouth-residing bacteria produce acids that wear away the hard enamel present on healthy teeth. Bacteria thrive on sugars, the compounds left behind after we consume any one of hundreds of foods and beverages.
When your teeth are not immediately cleaned, sugar from, say, soft drinks lingers on them, providing a hearty meal for bacteria. Equally bacteria friendly, though, are the sugars-added or naturally occurring-in many fruit juices. To minimize residue, have your child sip such beverages through a straw.
But here's the kicker: Fruit juices can have a second detriment-they are acidic, as well. And acids in foods and drinks affect teeth physically just as bacteria do-they erode enamel.
So, consider acidity when you serve your child otherwise nutritionally beneficial foods, including citrus fruits (lemons, oranges, etc.), tomatoes (including pizza, soup and pasta sauce), and other fruits and vegetables, such as pickles, with high acid content. Sweet honey, too, is surprisingly acidic.
Even without sugar, zero-calorie sodas are potentially harmful. Many contain phosphoric acid, citric acid or both that wear away enamel like any other acids. And while carbonation by itself isn't corrosive, the artificial sweeteners or flavorings in sparkling waters or seltzers boost the drinks' acidity. Energy drinks, bottled iced teas and lemonades may contain acids that wear away tooth enamel, as well.
After your child consumes these types of foods or drinks, have him or her rinse immediately with water to dilute and wash away the acids. Because the teeth may be softer after consuming acidic foods, have your child wait 20 minutes before brushing with American Dental Association-approved toothpaste.

The less sugar and acid that remain in your child's mouth, the fewer dining opportunities those oral-dwelling bacteria will have, and the possibility of erosion of the enamel is diminished. Ask Dr. Jared at KiDDS Dental about other ways your child can enjoy his or her favorite foods-acidic or not-and still maintain terrific oral health.
We'd love to meet you and your family. Call us to schedule an appointment today! (509)-891-7070.
<view entire article>





Crooked Teeth: No Laughing Matter

Date: April 28, 2017 | Time: 1:13pm | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Crooked Teeth: No Laughing Matter

Uh-oh ... one of your child's permanent teeth is coming in funny. Is this a cause for panic, or at least immediate treatment? An abnormally positioned tooth has definite drawbacks:
  • It might have an impact on appearance, especially if it's a front tooth.
  • It may cause discomfort.
  • It could prevent easy flossing.
But how do you treat abnormal tooth positioning? That question is a bit trickier, because every child's situation-and every tooth-is a little bit different.
In many cases, orthodontic treatment is the recognized solution. Orthodontists specialize in straightening teeth-with braces, wires, bands and other implements-to give your child a spectacular smile ... eventually. It's never too early to discuss whether your child needs corrective treatment. Our clinical team at KiDDS Dental will keep tabs on his or her developing mouth and teeth in order to help the orthodontist formulate a customized future treatment strategy.
First, Dr. Jared will determine the underlying reason for an emerging tooth's crookedness. Was the baby tooth in its spot (or next to it) lost too early? Is your child's mouth "crowded," with seemingly insufficient room for all 32 adult teeth? If so, why? Will the crooked tooth straighten out on its own over time (as is often the case with permanent front teeth)?
Once the reason for the problem is ascertained, we can provide treatment or refer your child to an orthodontist. Space maintainers may be useful if a primary tooth falls out too soon. By placing one in your child's mouth, we may be able to ensure that an adjacent permanent tooth doesn't cause problems by invading that space and taking up two spots. The goal is to prevent the tooth from having a permanently abnormal position.
An orthodontist may recommend extracting one or more healthy permanent teeth if they are causing harmful crowding in your child's mouth. This gives the other teeth room to spread out attractively and makes for more ideal positioning.

Dr. Jared can help your child achieve a healthy, attractive smile for life. Let us know at your next appointment if you have concerns about any teeth that are coming in funny.
Do you have any questions about early orthodontic treatment for your child? Call us to schedule an appointment today! (509)-891-7070.
<view entire article>





Kentucky Derby Hat Contest

Date: April 27, 2017 | Time: 11:57am | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

The KiDDS Dental 2017 Kentucky Derby Hat Contest Rules







Facebook in no way endorses or promotes this contest. It is solely promoted by KiDDS Dental.

Win a lunch for your team! Participate in the KiDDS Dental Kentucky Derby Hat Contest!

How to participate
1. Contact Alyssa@GrowUpSmiling.com to reserve your official KiDDS Dental Kentucky Derby Hat.
2. Decorate your hat.
3. Take a digital picture of your hat and email it to Brandie@GrowUpSmiling.com, making sure to note the name of your organization.
4. Get votes! Each "like" or "love" your hat gets in our "Kentucky Derby Hat" album will earn your organization one vote.
5. The

Some ideas to get votes:
  • Make a small sign to display with your hat explaining the contest and directing your patrons to "like" the picture on the KiDDS Dental Facebook page.
  • Post a link to the contest picture, from the KiDDS Dental Facebook page, to your organization's Facebook page and ask your fans to vote.
  • Include a link to the picture of your Kentucky Derby Hat in your company's e-newsletter.
  • Ask your team to share the picture on their personal Facebook pages.



Voting for the KiDDS Dental's "Kentucky Derby Hat" photo contest begins April 28, 2017 and ends at 5:00 pm, May 4, 2017. By submitting a photo, each entrant agrees to the rules and states that they are 18 years or older.
Who may enter: A member of the staff for invited businesses may enter on behalf of their business. KiDDS Dental will determine the eligibility of each photo submitted at its sole discretion.
What to enter: A picture of the provided hat that is decorated.
Photos that violate or infringe upon another person's rights, including to but not limited to copyright, are not eligible.
By entering the contest, entrants grant KiDDS Dental license to display, distribute, reproduce photographs.
Judging: Winner will be chosen by a popular vote.
Prize: The picture of the hat with the most reactions on Facebook will be the winner. The office that submits the winning photo will earn a catered lunch for the entire team.
<view entire article>





Date: April 25, 2017 | Time: 1:21pm | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Mother's DAY? No way!
We'll be celebrating mothers ALL WEEK on Facebook
and one lucky winner will get a Kindle Fire HD 8 just for playing along.
Look for a new way to enter to win each day
May 7th through May 13th.


Contest Rules:

By entering this promotion, participant agrees to a complete release of Facebook from any or all liability in connection with this contest. It is also acknowledgment that the contest is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook. No purchase is necessary to enter or win.



How to enter: Entries consist of following the directions (comment, "like," etc.) given in the official promotion posts on the KiDDS Dental Facebook page between May 7, 2017 at 9:00 AM and May 13, 2017 at 5:00 PM. One entry per promotion post per Facebook user is allowed. Multiple entries per promotion post will be disqualified.

Drawing: One random prize drawing will be held on or about May 14, 2017. The winner will receive a Kindle Fire HD 8. This prize is valued at $89. Cash cannot be awarded in lieu of prize. Prize is not transferable. The winner is solely responsible for reporting and paying applicable state and federal taxes. If a winner is disqualified or if a prize is unclaimed, KiDDS Dental reserves the right to conduct another drawing to determine an alternate winner or to not award that winner's prize, at its sole discretion.

Odds: Actual odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries.

Eligibility: Legal residents of the United States are eligible to participate and win. Any person under the age of 18 must have a parent's or legal guardian's permission to participate and/or win. Must be 13 years or older to enter. Employees of KiDDS Dental and their immediate families (spouse, parents, siblings, children, in-laws) are not eligible to enter. Winner must be available to pick up prize at KiDDS Dental in Liberty Lake, WA by May 19, 2017.

Decisions: By entering into the promotion, entrants and their parents or guardians (if the entrant is under the age of 18) agree to abide by and be bound by these official rules, and to accept the decision of KiDDS Dental as final. Entrants and their parents or guardians (if entrant is under the age of 18) also agree to hold KiDDS Dental harmless from any liability arising from participation in this promotion. KiDDS Dental is not responsible for entries not received because of technical difficulties. KiDDS Dental reserves the right to disqualify any participant to a person who fails to follow these official rules or uses fraudulent means in participating. If for any reason this promotion is not able to be conducted as planned, KiDDS Dental reserves the right to cancel, terminate, modify or suspend this promotion and randomly draw from the entries received up to the cancellation/suspension date.

Liability Release: By participating, each participant and winner waives any and all claims against KiDDS Dental their employees and agents for any personal loss of any kind which may occur from the participation in the promotion.

Publicity: Each winner (and such winner's parent or guardian if any winner is under the age of 18) agrees to permit KiDDS Dental to use his/her name and likeness in promotional and other KiDDS Dental materials, without additional compensation or permission, except where prohibited by law.

This promotion is void where prohibited.

By entering the contest, entrants grant KiDDS Dental license to display, distribute, reproduce contest entries. Winners must sign a media release and will be responsible for paying any taxes they may owe on a prize.
<view entire article>





Could Your Child's Teeth Cause Ear Infections?

Date: April 14, 2017 | Time: 10:30am | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Could Your Child's Teeth Cause Ear Infections?

Researchers have debated whether malocclusion-a less-than-ideal bite pattern, such as crossbite-plays a role in the development of middle ear infections (otitis media). Now, a recently published study says that the two conditions may be linked after all.

Middle ear infections occur when fluid builds up behind the eardrum. Symptoms of acute otitis media include redness, pain, fever and often pus. A second type, called otitis media with effusion, is more common and can be caused by an infection, allergies and exposure to irritants such as cigarette smoke. Both types can cause hearing problems, and repeat infections can cause scarring.

The study examined 50 children between 6 and 8 years of age, including 25 children with ear infections and 25 healthy children who formed a control group. Children in both groups were given an ear, nose and throat examination, and dental casts were made of the children's mouths so measurements could be taken.

The researchers then looked at the relationships between these measurements and the children's tonsils and adenoids to determine whether the examination findings and bite patterns were associated. They found that 76% of the children in the ear infection group, a significant number, had posterior crossbite malocclusion (a malocclusion involving the back teeth).

Despite the results of this study, earlier research examining the relationship between ear infection and malocclusion patterns has been less conclusive. In fact, both a 1998 study of 112 children under 6 years of age and a 2010 study of 100 children from 4 to 10 years of age found no relationship between bite patterns and ear infections.

So what does this mean for you as a parent? If your child has ear infections, let Dr. Jared at KiDDS Dental know. We can evaluate your child to see if he/she may benefit from having his or her bite analyzed. If a malocclusion does exist, you can consider options for having it corrected.


The effect of poor bite patterns can extend far beyond ear infections. Malocclusion can cause many oral health problems, including abnormal tooth wear, tooth decay and eventual tooth loss. A bite analysis performed early may prevent these more serious conditions from developing later in life.

Dr. Jared would love to discuss further information on the correlation between ear infections and malocclusion patterns. Call us to schedule an appointment today! (509)-891-7070.
<view entire article>





Could Tooth Grinding Cause Your Child's Headaches?

Date: March 31, 2017 | Time: 1:03pm | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Could Tooth Grinding Cause Your Child's Headaches?

Childhood headaches are always concerning to parents, especially when they occur on a regular basis. Headaches can occur for a variety of reasons, including anxiety over schoolwork or peer issues and even uncorrected vision problems. But one of the most common sources of childhood headaches is also one of the most commonly overlooked, and it starts right in your child's mouth.

Chronic bruxism-tooth grinding and clenching-is a common habit that affects about a third of children, often persisting into adulthood. What's worse, tooth grinding or jaw clenching often occurs at night, making it difficult to self-diagnose. While no one is entirely sure why children tend to grind their teeth, many researchers believe it may occur as a response to anxiety, stress or pain such as an earache. Bruxism also appears to be strongly associated with misaligned teeth that do not fit together properly. Headaches result from jaw muscles that clench tightly while grinding, resulting in muscle tension and soreness.

Dr. Jared and his clinical team have experience in treating bruxism successfully. If your child's teeth do not line up properly, we may be able to gently grind the surfaces of the teeth to eliminate any raised spots that may keep teeth from meeting as they should. We may also prescribe a mouthguard for your child to wear at night that can protect teeth and keep jaw muscles from becoming sore.

There are five steps you can take as well:

Step 1: Listen closely. You may actually be able to hear grating sounds coming from your child's mouth during sleep.

Step 2: Gently massage your child's jaw to help loosen stiff muscles.

Step 3: Reduce stress before bed by reading a funny story or engaging in another relaxing ritual.

Step 4: Make sure your child drinks lots of water during the day; some experts believe that dehydration can cause tooth grinding or exacerbate headaches.

Step 5: Have your child visit us regularly. Even when you cannot hear or see evidence of grinding and clenching, we can recognize subtle signs, like tooth wear, left behind by bruxism.

Everyone gets headaches, and an occasional bout is probably nothing to worry about. But if your child suffers from headaches regularly, talk to both your pediatrician and Dr. Jared to rule out more serious underlying conditions and to help your child be as healthy and pain-free as possible.

Give us a call at (509)-891-7070 to schedule today!


<view entire article>





Choosing the Right Mouthwash for Your Child

Date: March 17, 2017 | Time: 12:28pm | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Choosing the Right Mouthwash for Your Child

It can be hard enough getting children to brush and floss their teeth; is it really necessary to add mouthwash to the mix? According to the American Dental Association, mouthwash can help prevent gingivitis, combat bacteria in the mouth and, if the mouthwash contains fluoride, reduce cavities. And for children who are not always the most diligent brushers, this extra step can actually do a lot of good. Remember that mouthwash is not a substitute for routine brushing and flossing.

After the age of six, most children can begin to incorporate mouthwash into their oral health routine. Younger children are not adept at the swish-and-spit process and may swallow too much of the fluid. Always instruct children younger than 12 years of age in good rinsing habits. Supervise as necessary to minimize swallowing. You can show your child how to use the mouthwash by using it yourself. When your child uses mouthwash, start by diluting it with water to make it less potent until he or she gets the hang of spitting it all out.

It is important to choose a mouthwash that your child will actually want to use as well as one that is safe for children. Most children's mouthwashes contain fluoride to give young teeth an extra boost. Some brands have special dyes that show your child the location of bacteria and food in the mouth; they may find this feature intriguing. Child-friendly mouthwashes also contain less alcohol and come in fun flavors like bubble gum or grape. For those who prefer natural options, there are products on the market that use naturally derived ingredients, such as xylitol, baking soda and essential oils.

Mouthwashes marketed to adults can be used, as well, but these are best used by teens. Young children often end up swallowing more mouthwash than they should, and adult mouthwashes may contain higher levels of ingredients that are harmful if ingested in large amounts.


Before using a new mouthwash, always check with Dr. Jared at KiDDS Dental to make sure that it is safe for children-and happy swishing!

Give us a call at (509)-891-7070 to schedule today. We'd love to meet you and your family.


<view entire article>





Choose the Right Toothbrush for Your Child

Date: March 3, 2017 | Time: 9:00am | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Choose the Right Toothbrush for Your Child

Teaching children to brush regularly is essential to keeping their teeth and gums healthy. But with so many toothbrush types on the market-disposable, battery-powered, electronic-how do you choose the one that is best for your child while meeting your budget considerations?

While it is important to select a toothbrush appropriate to your child's age, size and special needs, your child should also like using the toothbrush. Children who like their toothbrush will be more likely to brush regularly and properly. If your child is old enough, let him or her help pick out a new toothbrush.

Dr. Jared and his clinical team can advise you in this important choice. Here are some additional suggestions:

  • Select a toothbrush that has an American Dental Association Seal of Approval. This will ensure that the construction and materials of the toothbrush are appropriate for children.
  • Pick an age-appropriate toothbrush. Most children's toothbrushes have the recommended age range printed on the box. If the brush head is too small or too large, it will not reach all areas of your child's mouth. The handle should feel comfortable so that your child will be able to use it properly.
  • Choose soft bristles. A child's teeth and gums are more sensitive than an adult's, especially when the child is teething. A soft-bristled brush cleans teeth well without wearing away tooth enamel or gum tissue. The bristled end of the toothbrush should be small and round, so that the child will not be hurt if his or her hand slips while brushing.
  • Choose a special brush for braces. Children who wear braces may do better with special orthodontic toothbrushes that have bristles altered to reach hard-to-clean areas.
  • Disposable or battery powered? Both types can effectively keep teeth and gums healthy. The choice may depend on your child's preferences and age, as well as the evaluation of your pediatric dentist.
  • Options and attractions. Child-friendly toothbrush designs make the brushing experience fun and may be more effective. Some brushes feature cartoon characters or a variety of colors. Several models play music or flash timed colored lights to let your child know how long to brush.

Whichever choice you make, be sure to replace your child's toothbrush as recommended, usually every three months for the average disposable brush. KiDDS Dental is your best resource in the choice and maintenance of the right toothbrush for your child's oral health.

Call us to schedule an appointment today! (509)-891-7070.
<view entire article>





Children's Dental X-rays-Safer than Ever

Date: February 17, 2017 | Time: 1:11pm | Posted By: noreply@blogger.com (KiDDS Dental)

Children's Dental X-rays-Safer than Ever

A 2012 study from the Yale University School of Medicine that found an association between dental x-rays in children and an increased risk of a particular type of brain tumor received a great deal of publicity in the media and may well have scared many parents. However, media coverage tended to leave out several important factors suggesting that there was less to worry about than first appeared, including the fact that many of the patients with brain tumors were older people who had undergone dental x-rays decades ago, when the amount of radiation exposure was significantly higher than it is today.

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry has issued guidelines on dental x-rays for infants, children and adolescents. These guidelines, which were officially reviewed at the time of the 2012 study, note that x-rays are a valuable tool for diagnosing oral diseases, and monitoring dentofacial development and the progress of therapy. Since every patient is unique, we base decisions about the need for dental x-rays on each child's individual circumstances.

We use x-rays when we expect that the results will have an impact on patient care. We weigh the benefits of obtaining radiographs against any risks to your child from radiation exposure. The use of lead aprons, thyroid collars and high-speed film minimize your child's exposure to radiation. Our equipment at KiDDS Dental and procedures conform to the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) standard for radiation exposure.


Children may require x-rays more often than adults because their teeth and jaws are still developing, and their teeth are more likely to be affected by tooth decay than are those of adults. Certain oral conditions cannot be diagnosed except through the use of x-rays. Some of these conditions, if left untreated, can be a much greater health threat than the radiation from dental x-rays. Dental x-rays are a valuable diagnostic tool that can help preserve your child's health.

If you have further questions regarding dental x-rays, click here to schedule an appointment with Dr. Jared. Or give us a call at (509)-891-7070.
<view entire article>